Health Congregational Nursing Ministry

The Health-Congregational Nursing Ministry of FMBC shall promote good health by providing information and education on good nutrition, proper exercise, rest, and health related activities.  Congregational Nursing consists of registered (RN) and licensed practitioner nurses (LPN) who share their skills in promoting holistic health and ministry.

Mental Health Awareness Month

 

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, a time to raise awareness of those living with mental illness or a substance use disorder and to help reduce the stigma associated with them. Mental Health Awareness Week is happening between 9 to 15 May 2022. The official theme is ‘loneliness’ and, across the week, we encourage you to build meaningful connections with your friends, family, colleagues and communities.

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.

Over the course of your life, if you experience mental health problems, your thinking, mood, and behavior could be affected. Many factors contribute to mental health problems, including:

  • Biological factors, such as genes or brain chemistry

  • Life experiences, such as trauma or abuse

  • Family history of mental health problems

Early Warning Signs

Not sure if you or someone you know is living with mental health problems? Experiencing one or more of the following feelings or behaviors can be an early warning sign of a problem:

  • Eating or sleeping too much or too little

  • Pulling away from people and usual activities

  • Having low or no energy

  • Feeling numb or like nothing matters

  • Having unexplained aches and pains

  • Feeling helpless or hopeless

  • Smoking, drinking, or using drugs more than usual

  • Feeling unusually confused, forgetful, on edge, angry, upset, worried, or scared

  • Yelling or fighting with family and friends

  • Experiencing severe mood swings that cause problems in relationships

  • Having persistent thoughts and memories you can't get out of your head

  • Hearing voices or believing things that are not true

  • Thinking of harming yourself or others

  • Inability to perform daily tasks like taking care of your kids or getting to work or school

For example, loneliness affects many of us at one time or another. We know that loneliness can be both the driver for and a product of poor mental health. Our society is changing fast. The pandemic has given rise to a sense of loneliness and isolation undermining confidence in daily routines. In recent times, many of us have had far less access to loved ones. Video Conferencing is enabling healthcare professionals to see more patients without the need to travel, but on the flip side of the coin, convenience and cost efficiencies are driving more and more activities online. Our workplaces are also changing. With many adapting to home and hybrid working, we need to embrace this change while building and maintaining meaningful connections with our colleagues.

Positive mental health allows people to:

  • Realize their full potential

  • Cope with the stresses of life

  • Work productively

  • Make meaningful contributions to their communities

Ways to maintain positive mental health include:

  • Getting professional help if you need it

  • Connecting with others

  • Staying positive

  • Getting physically active

  • Helping others

  • Getting enough sleep

  • Developing coping skills

Most people with mental health problems can get better. Treatment and recovery are ongoing processes that happen over time.

Recovery from mental disorders and/or substance abuse disorders is a process of change through which individuals:

  • Improve their health and wellness

  • Live a self-directed life

  • Strive to achieve their full potential

Four major dimensions support a life in recovery:

  • Health: Overcoming or managing one’s disease(s) or symptoms and making informed, healthy choices that support physical and emotional well-being.

  • Home: Have a stable and safe place to live.

  • Purpose: Engage in meaningful daily activities, such as a job or school, volunteering, caring for your family, or being creative. Work for independence, income, and resources to participate in society.

  • Community: Build relationships and social networks that provide support, friendship, love, and hope.

Develop a Recovery Plan

If you are struggling with a mental health problem, you may want to develop a written recovery plan.

  • Enable you to identify goals for achieving wellness

  • Specify what you can do to reach those goals

  • Include daily activities as well as longer term goals

  • Track any changes in your mental health problem

  • Identify triggers or other stressful events that can make you feel worse, and help you learn how to manage them

 

Additional information can be found at:

About Mental Health (cdc.gov)

What Is Mental Health? | MentalHealth.gov                                                                                                                        

                        Dr. Audrey Kizzie                                      Health Congregational Nursing Ministry Coordinator